Love LeWitt as much as we do? Want this really cool shirt to show your LeWitt love?
We’re giving away free shirts to some of our Facebook and Twitter followers. If you’re not yet following - now’s the time!twitter.com/mass_mocafacebook.com/massmoca

Love LeWitt as much as we do? Want this really cool shirt to show your LeWitt love?

We’re giving away free shirts to some of our Facebook and Twitter followers. If you’re not yet following - now’s the time!
twitter.com/mass_moca
facebook.com/massmoca

mutt-r
mutt-r:

http://solidsoundfestival.com
wil you please take a look @ saturday’s lineup? i know it’s probably outdoors. so there will be no walls. for me to be a fly on. so instead i’d like to be a fly in those tents. or just buzzing around the campgrounds. or hell, i know….maybe i’ll just buy a ticket and go. yeah, that’s it. the play’s the thing!!

We’re glad to hear you’re as excited as we are!

mutt-r:

http://solidsoundfestival.com

wil you please take a look @ saturday’s lineup? i know it’s probably outdoors. so there will be no walls. for me to be a fly on. so instead i’d like to be a fly in those tents. or just buzzing around the campgrounds. or hell, i know….maybe i’ll just buy a ticket and go. yeah, that’s it. the play’s the thing!!

We’re glad to hear you’re as excited as we are!

Throwback Thursday: The Marshall Street Complex in 1970
Pictured here, protesting employees at Sprague Electric, which occupied the MASS MoCA complex until the mid-eighties and employed in its height over 4,000 North Adams residents. In 1970, relations between the factory and its workers became more than a little chilly due to a contract dispute. The rising costs of labor and international competition in the electronics market eventually forced Sprague to close its doors.

Throwback Thursday: The Marshall Street Complex in 1970

Pictured here, protesting employees at Sprague Electric, which occupied the MASS MoCA complex until the mid-eighties and employed in its height over 4,000 North Adams residents. In 1970, relations between the factory and its workers became more than a little chilly due to a contract dispute. The rising costs of labor and international competition in the electronics market eventually forced Sprague to close its doors.